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Topic: Community and Workplace Support

Missed Opportunities to Support Breastfeeding

We are missing many opportunities to support breastfeeding in the United States. In the healthcare system, broken communication, competing priorities, and low confidence in support skills create roadblocks for lactation support throughout the breastfeeding journey. As a consequence of these missed opportunities, 60% of mothers stop breastfeeding before they planned, and only a quarter of babies are exclusively breastfed at six months old despite high breastfeeding initiation rates. Our system is failing breastfeeding families. Supporting families every step of the way requires frequent & consistent education, counseling, problem solving, and communication among all providers.

2021 Breastfeeding Inspiration Guide

August 1st marks the beginning of National Breastfeeding Month and World Breastfeeding Week, celebrating the benefits of breastfeeding for families in the United States and around the world. All month long, 1,000 Days and its fellow advocates will be highlighting breastfeeding in different communities and how we can build a landscape of breastfeeding support.

Workers in Texas Deserve Paid Leave

We conducted multiple, in-depth interviews with four low-income women in Texas throughout their pregnancy and postpartum period. Each of these women, who vary in age, race, marital status, educational attainment and occupation, have one key thing in common: they do not have access to paid family and medical leave.

Learn more about what makes paid leave a public health imperative.

Workers in Pennsylvania Deserve Paid Leave

We conducted multiple, in-depth interviews with four low-income women in Pennsylvania throughout their pregnancy and postpartum period. Each of these women, who vary in age, race, marital status, educational attainment and occupation, have one key thing in common: they do not have access to paid family and medical leave.

Learn more about what makes paid leave a public health imperative.

Workers in Kansas Deserve Paid Leave

We conducted multiple, in-depth interviews with four low-income women in Kansas throughout their pregnancy and postpartum period. Each of these women, who vary in age, race, marital status, educational attainment and occupation, have one key thing in common: they do not have access to paid family and medical leave.

Learn more about what makes paid leave a public health imperative.

Workers in Georgia Deserve Paid Leave

We conducted multiple, in-depth interviews with four low-income women in Georgia throughout their pregnancy and postpartum period. Each of these women, who vary in age, race, marital status, educational attainment and occupation, have one key thing in common: they do not have access to paid family and medical leave.

Learn more about what makes paid leave a public health imperative.

Qualitative Paid Leave Report: Furthering Our Case for Paid Leave in the United States

Our latest report, Qualitative Paid Leave Report: Furthering Our Case for Paid Leave in the United States, is based on a study we commissioned to examine how lack of paid leave affects the well-being of new mothers and their babies, particularly women working in low-wage jobs, and to amplify the experiences of low-wage working mothers in their own words. By interviewing and surveying 20 women in five states that did not require workers to have access to paid leave, we learned about how mothers navigate the experiences, demands and joys of motherhood.

For more about the report, our work with paid leave and how you can help, visit here.

Nourishing Gender Equality: How Nutrition Interventions are an Underleveraged Tool in the Fight for Women’s Rights

The nutrition and women’s empowerment sectors are mutually reinforcing, and it is time to link them more intentionally. Nutrition interventions are critical to making concrete, cost-effective, and long-lasting improvements to the status of women and girls around the world.

There are three specific areas where a more intentional focus on nutrition offers advantages for women and girls in their fight for gender equality:

  • From even before a girl is born, good nutrition is a crucial component in supporting her lifelong right to Health and Survival, allowing women to live longer, better lives.
  • By boosting individual workforce participation and earning potential, good nutrition has a proven positive impact on women’s full and equal Economic Participation and Opportunity.
  • Access to good nutrition allows girls’ brains to develop fully and impacts how well women and girls can perform in school. It also secures their right to equal Educational Attainment with men and boys.