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Systemic Racism is a Public Health Crisis

Why advocacy and aid organizations working to improve nutrition, health, and poverty outcomes for children and families everywhere must join the fight against White supremacy and dismantling systemic racism.

As communities continue to demand justice for the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Dominique Rem’mie Fells, and countless other Black women and men, our national and global health, economic, and social fabrics are managing the containment and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Black people are facing two crises at once – a health system that has failed to support us and a criminal justice system that continues to marginalize, harm, and kill us. 

We’re witnessing how the lack of a robust, anti-racist approach to policymaking and funding has led to major disparities in health, economic, and social outcomes. This is especially personal because of my profession. At my organization, we’re focused on helping mothers and children have the healthiest 1,000 days, the time between a woman’s pregnancy and her baby’s second birthday, which has tremendous impacts on her family’s and community’s future health and wellness. I have seen first-hand how lack of access to nutritious foods and health services impact nutritional and broader public health outcomes too. 

We see the effects of systemic racism in public health every day. The U.S. is the only industrialized country in the world that doesn’t offer its taxpayers universal health coverage (UHC) – and Black, Latinx, and Indigenous communities face the consequences of this the hardest. Unequal access to adequate health insurance, mental health services, and rising pharmaceutical costs sustain the impacts of racism. This is visible in the lack of robust UHC in countries with high-burdens of disease and malnutrition as well. Strong health and social systems that serve everyone enable individuals to thrive and prosper. But systemic racism has led to disparities in access to these services, which impacts not only the lives of those who need them but also the prosperity of the community as a whole. 

This is why I urge my fellow nutrition advocacy, international development, and global health colleagues to assess how we are approaching our work and whether we’re equipped to do so in an actively anti-racist way. 

Our organizations are complicit in White supremacy as well. Organizations with missions to improve health, economic, and social outcomes for Black and brown communities must be led and managed by the people they are trying to serve! Yet, I continue to see anti-poverty and aid/international development organizations that lack racially-diverse leadership and boards. 

I am a Black Ethiopian-American woman in my 20s and have been working in the advocacy and international development space based in Washington D.C. since college. I am too familiar with what it feels like to be the only Black person, let alone Black woman, in the room. Sometimes my voice and experiences are valued, but often I feel they are either tokenized or my presence in the room is meant to fit a diversity quota. 

This is further perpetuated by the lack of transparency in salaries within organizations, as well as program structures and funding relationships that continue to uphold racist and colonial thinking. How are we supposed to achieve progress on domestic and global goals if we can’t dismantle and rebuild how WE internally conduct our work?

What’s next from here? I propose we H.A.L.T – Hire, Adapt, Listen and Try. Organizations must hire diverse leadership; adapt the current systems and structures; listen to the community they serve; and try harder – it’s nowhere near enough! 

The first step towards being an anti-racist organization is listening, hiring, and fully supporting Black and brown people, especially women, from marginalized communities. This will require honest conversations that go beyond statements – we need action! Donors also need to audit how they program and distribute funding. Community-based solutions live within communities, and we must empower these communities with the resources and funding so grassroots organizations can combat the problems they are facing. 

Unfair systems lead to unequal access, and greater inequities in nutritional and health outcomes. This is evident in the 2020 Global Nutrition Report that brilliantly lays out a frame for how inequities in nutritional outcomes across communities and countries are perpetuated by unfair processes for basic human rights within socioeconomic and political contexts. 

If we truly want to “leave no-one behind” and achieve progress for all, we must understand how White supremacy operates and upholds an unjust environment for public service and global health development. Anti-racism work must be at the forefront of our domestic and global advocacy agendas

#March4Nutrition: Envision better support for the most vulnerable babies, toddlers and families

This National Nutrition Month, 1,000 Days is imagining a world in which all moms and babies are healthy, nourished and thriving through our annual #March4Nutrition campaign.

All month long we have been featuring the issues affecting mothers and their children, the work of 1,000 Days and our partners to ensure moms and babies are healthy and thriving, and how you can get involved!

This week we’re envisioning better programs that help the most vulnerable babies, toddlers and families get the food, nutrition and support they need to thrive.

Programs and policies that prioritize the health and nutrition of moms and babies can significantly improve health outcomes for young children and their families. These societal investments can positively impact the nutritional health of women, infants, toddlers and families by improving access to healthy foods, increasing a family’s economic security, and improving access to health services.

Providing moms and babies with the right supports – from the start – sets them up for success for the rest of their lives. But that requires expanding and strengthening programs and policies that help the most vulnerable with food and nutrition in the U.S. and around the world.

The Current Situation

Throughout the world, millions of young children and their mothers are struggling to get the nutrition, health care and support they need to thrive. Globally, an estimated 151 million children under age five are developmentally stunted as a result of chronic malnutrition in the first 1,000 days. Importantly, the data shows that 20-30% of childhood stunting begins before a baby is even born, highlighting the need to focus on maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy to stop the cycle of malnutrition.

This global crisis requires action and investment in the nutrition and well-being of women and children in the first 1,000 days, with a focus on the most disadvantaged.

In the U.S., poverty is a key driver of malnutrition as poor families struggle to access nutritious food and health services. A staggering 1 in 6 children in the U.S. under age 6 live in families that struggle to put enough nutritious food on the table every day. These children are less likely to get a thriving start to life because persistent food insecurity and poor nutrition put young children at risk of developmental delays and cognitive deficits.

Federal nutrition programs like the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) play a critical role in supporting the health and nutrition of young children and their families. Half of all babies in the U.S. are born into families participating in WIC, meaning their families receive supplemental nutritious foods, health care referrals, nutrition education, and breastfeeding support. WIC is a proven effective program that improves birth outcomes, access to healthy food and a child’s development.

The Opportunity

We envision a world where ALL babies, toddlers and families can access the food, nutrition and support they need to nourish themselves and the next generation.

Globally, 1,000 Days is helping to reduce the number of children who are affected by the devastating effects of malnutrition by advocating for proven, cost-effective nutrition programs. In 2018, Congress extended the Global Food Security Act (GFSA) for another 5 years through 2023. This legislation is an important step forward in recognizing that the nutritional status of women and children, especially during the critical 1,000-day window, is essential. 1,000 Days played a key role in advocating for the nutrition provisions in the legislation and continues to work to strengthen and expand global nutrition programs.

In the U.S., 1,000 Days educates policymakers on the critical importance of WIC, seeking to ensure ALL eligible women and children can participate in the program. 1,000 Days also championed the passing of a bipartisan Farm Bill that protects the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). This means better access to nutritious foods for millions of families with young children.

In a world where all babies, toddlers and families have the support and nutrition they need, moms and their children will be nourished and healthy in their first 1,000 days and beyond.

#March4Nutrition: Envision better diets for babies and toddlers

This National Nutrition Month, 1,000 Days is imagining a world in which all moms and babies are healthy, nourished and thriving through our annual #March4Nutrition campaign.

All month long, we invite you to follow #March4Nutrition on Facebook and Twitter to learn about the issues affecting mothers and their children, the work of 1,000 Days and our partners to ensure moms and babies are healthy and thriving, and how you can get involved!

This week we’re envisioning better diets for babies and toddlers.

Food preferences and eating habits start forming in the first 1,000 days. In fact, during the first trimester of pregnancy, a baby’s sense of smell and taste begin to develop, which means all of the early “tasting” a baby does in utero can influence the kinds of food he will like later in life. Then, once a baby is born, breastfeeding provides him with the perfect nutrition to support brain development, healthy growth and a strong immune system. At 6 months of age, a baby starts to need more than just breastmilk or formula to support his rapid growth and development, so it is essential that he begins to be introduced to nutrient-rich whole foods like vegetables, fruits and proteins. And by the time a baby transitions to toddlerhood, he is encouraged to eat healthy meals to continue to fuel a strong body and smart brain.

Just as important as what babies and toddlers eat is what they should not eat – like foods and drinks with too much sugar or sodium. Unhealthy eating is a serious concern, as it is contributing to a dramatic rise in the levels of obesity in toddlers and young children. Young children who are overweight or obese are much more likely to be obese as adults and are at increased risk for serious health problems in adulthood, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Supporting healthy weight gain, teaching good eating habits and encouraging responsive feeding practices for babies and toddlers can help build a foundation for a thriving future.

The Current Situation

Unfortunately, too many kids grow up without the essential nutrients they need to thrive. Globally, poor diet is responsible for more ill health than any other cause and is the second-leading risk factor for death. In addition, only 51% of children aged 6-23 months meet the minimum meal frequency, and a mere 25% meet the minimum dietary diversity, with large disparities on these rates around the world. Meanwhile, as unhealthy diets and feeding practices become pervasive, obesity is increasingly affecting young children.

Here in the U.S., the situation is similarly concerning. The diets of U.S. infants and toddlers now mirror the adult American diet, with too few fruits, vegetables and other nutrient-rich foods and too many added sugars and saturated fats. More than a quarter of young children from 6 months to 4 years do not eat a single serving of vegetables on a given day. Among those toddlers who do eat vegetables, french fries are most commonly consumed. Meanwhile, over half of toddlers and preschoolers have one or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day.

Furthermore, parents and caregivers often make eating and feeding decisions with very little guidance and use conflicting information. According to a nationally representative online survey conducted by 1,000 Days and Harris Poll, more than half of the mothers surveyed said they received mixed messages about what to feed their young children. Mothers and other caregivers struggle to reconcile contradictory information on infant and young child feeding from a wide array of sources ranging from health providers to parenting sites and other moms on social media.

The Opportunity

We envision a world where ALL parents can access the information and the nutritious foods they need to give their kids a healthy start.

1,000 Days is taking several important steps to ensure babies and toddlers everywhere have healthy diets. As an immediate solution, we are partnering with experts – including the CDC – to translate evidence-based nutrition information into practical resources for parents. We answer parents’ top questions about what, when, and how to feed infants and toddlers in a series of bite-sized videos. Watch them here!

We are also tracking the development of the first-ever dietary recommendations for pregnant women, infants and toddlers in the next Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The new guidance will provide parents and caregivers with the evidence-based information they need to give their children the best chance to lead healthy, prosperous lives that are free of preventable chronic disease. The recommendations will also inform federal nutrition programs that reach young children and their families, as well as serve as an important reference point for physicians, nutrition counselors, and early childcare providers.

In a world where all babies and toddlers have healthy diets, children will be set up for a healthy, thriving future. This is the world we want.

The First 1,000 Days: Listening to America’s Mothers

This Presentation Uses Sound


The numbers and statistics paint a concerning picture for America’s young children and their families: nearly half of all infants and toddlers in the U.S. live in low-income households and 1 in 5 children under the age of 6 live in families that struggle to put enough nutritious food on the table. What’s clear is that too many young children in America aren’t getting the nutrition they need to thrive. But the numbers are only one part of a much more important story: what women themselves have to say about their experiences with nutrition, feeding and diet during pregnancy and their children’s earliest years.

In order to understand the perspectives of mothers themselves, 1,000 Days set off on a listening journey to hear from moms across the country about their thoughts on nutrition and their experiences in feeding their young children. We met nearly 60 mothers –women in rural Oklahoma to urban centers in California; in southern states like Mississippi and Kentucky to Minnesota in the Midwest.

From their very first feeding decisions, the mothers we met face conflicting messages from various sources and too few strategies to put their knowledge into action. Further, they deal with a lack of support in their homes, schools, workplaces and communities. And too often, when they aren’t able to provide what they know is best for their children, moms blame themselves.

Scroll down and listen as Wanda, Chloe and Toshina talk about their personal experiences as moms with young children. Please note, these audio clips were recorded in the women’s homes so there is background noise. You may need to turn up the volume on your headphones.

Wanda

Wanda lives in Kentucky with her husband and 3 boys: a 4-year-old, a 22-month-old and an 8-week-old. In this audio clip, Wanda discusses the challenges of breastfeeding and notes that it can be especially tough in the beginning when mom and baby are still getting the hang of it. At first she didn’t feel comfortable nursing in public, but as time passed she became more confident. Wanda also highlights the hardships many breastfeeding moms face when forced to return to work—especially an unsupportive workplace—before they are ready.

Chloe

Chloe shares a motel room in California with her husband and her three children, all of which are under age 4. In her audio clip, Chloe discusses the challenges she faces in buying and preparing healthy foods for her family. Without an oven or stove, Chloe must rely on a rice cooker and hot plate for all of her cooking. She worries about the safety of her young children with this set-up, especially when they run around the small room – she doesn’t want them to pull the cords and hurt themselves. When Chloe doesn’t have enough food, she visits food pantries or reaches out to other moms she meets through groups on Facebook. She hopes to be able to move out of the motel and into a better housing situation soon.

Toshina

Toshina is from Mississippi, where she lives with her parents and two sons – a 15-month-old and a 2-month-old. In this clip, Toshina shares her story about trying to meet her breastfeeding goals as a high school student. Despite not having any family members who could help her, Toshina started breastfeeding with the encouragement of another mother she met at a local parenting class. Although she loves all the health benefits of breastfeeding, for Toshina, the best part is the connection she feels to her son when she nurses.

We are deeply grateful to each of the women who participated in this research. All of the moms featured in the report provided permissions for their words and photos to be shared, but their names have been changed. They opened up their homes and hearts to us and generously shared their stories. It is an honor to share those stories with you.

For more information and to read about some of the other moms who participated in this research, read The First 1,000 Days: Listening to America’s Mothers.

Time to Move On and Move Forward on Health Care

Senate leadership and the Trump Administration continue to play politics with people’s health care. Senator McConnell is planning for a vote early next week to entirely repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—with no plan to replace it. This is a desperate and irresponsible tactic that will result in 32 million Americans losing health coverage. The impact will be felt immediately, with 17 million people becoming uninsured next year. Or, they may resurrect the already-failed Better Health Care Reconciliation Act, which would similarly negatively impact millions of Americans and put the health of moms and babies at risk.

It’s time to move on and move forward.

1,000 Days urges every senator to reject these efforts, and instead to turn their attention to finding real solutions for America’s health care needs.

1,000 Days is calling on our elected officials to work together in a bi-partisan manner to support and stabilize the health insurance markets and ensure women, infants and young children have access to comprehensive and affordable health care. 1,000 Days also supports continued federal commitment to—and full funding of—Medicaid and CHIP, which together provide more than 45 million children with health insurance coverage.

We look forward to working with Congress and the Administration to build on the success of the ACA to ensure all mothers, babies and toddlers in America have the care they need to thrive.

Statement on House Appropriations Committee’s Passage of State and Foreign Operations Bill

1,000 Days is grateful to House appropriators for their support of maternal and child nutrition in the Fiscal Year 2018 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations bill. The legislation maintains level funding –$125 million – for nutrition in the Global Health Programs account. We appreciate the committee’s support for “effective nutrition interventions to reduce stunting, increase breastfeeding, promote early childhood development, and treat severe malnutrition”, as noted in the accompanying report.

Funding from the nutrition sub-account supports vital services to improve maternal diets; enhance nutrition during pregnancy; promote breastfeeding; and improve infant and young child feeding practices. These and other activities are essential to the goals outlined in the House report.

However, while we appreciate the House bill’s rejection of the Administration’s proposed deep cuts and eliminations to vital programs, and though we recognize the allocation provided the committee was lower than in recent years, we are concerned by the $10 billion cut to the FY18 international affairs topline as compared to the current level. Improved nutritional outcomes require a multi-sectoral response and robust funding across global health, development and humanitarian accounts, as well as sufficient resources to maintain strong technical capacity at USAID and other agencies.

For this reason, it is imperative that the full range of investments are protected and brought to scale so that we can see the tremendous returns possible when contributions from all sources – including the United States – are increased for high-impact interventions: 3.7 million child lives saved, 65 million fewer stunted children, and 265 million fewer women suffering from anemia.

The right nutrition in the first 1,000 days is an investment in ensuring children can reach their full potential and countries can reach their broader economic development goals. We appreciate the committee’s leadership and all Members who have championed greater progress against malnutrition. 1,000 Days looks forward to working with them and their Senate counterparts to ensure sustained and greater gains moving forward.

Statement on the Threat to Essential Health Benefits

We at 1,000 Days are profoundly troubled by reports that the leadership of the U.S House of Representatives is working to take away the guaranteed health benefits that are critical to ensuring healthy pregnancies and healthy babies.  As part of the American Health Care Act, (a.k.a.“TrumpCare”), many in the White House and Congress want to take away the “essential health benefit” requirement which covers pregnancy and maternity services, childbirth and newborn and pediatric care, and they are rushing this to a vote at any cost.  This is dangerous and irresponsible.

Without comprehensive coverage for maternity care, childbirth and pediatric services, a woman and her baby are put at greater risk for serious health problems including low birthweight, preterm birth, and even death.  Moreover, when moms and babies don’t have adequate health care, we all pay the price.  Pre-term births alone are estimated to cost the U.S. $26 billion per year in medical and social services costs and lost wages and economic productivity.

Ensuring that women have the health coverage they need to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies should be a non-negotiable.  Maternity care, childbirth and pediatric services must remain essential health benefits and must be required to be covered by all health insurance plans in the U.S.

We urge Congress to strongly reject the American Health Care Act which will force many hard-working families to pay more money for lower quality insurance and endanger the wellbeing of mothers and young children throughout America.

Statement on the Introduction of the American Health Care Act

1,000 Days has serious concerns about how the American Health Care Act will negatively affect the health and well-being of babies, toddlers and their parents.  As proposed, this bill will force many hard-working families of young children to pay more money for lower quality insurance.

The 1,000 day window between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s 2nd birthday is a critical window of opportunity to ensure healthy and thriving futures. For this reason, 1,000 Days supports comprehensive coverage for pre-conception and pre-natal care, maternity services, breastfeeding and post-partum supports, pediatric care and other essential maternal, infant and young child health services as well as investments in ensuring families with young children can access Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) as needed.

The American Health Care Act puts the health of children during their first 1,000 days at risk.  It will make coverage in the health insurance marketplace more expensive and out-of-reach for millions of hard-working families.  Under the American Health Care Act, a woman will pay more out-of-pocket to get the critical health services she needs before, during and after pregnancy that help ensure she has a healthy baby.  And when expectant mothers can’t afford health insurance, we all pay the price.

We are also concerned about the severe cuts to Medicaid and CHIP, which today play a critical role in providing health insurance to low-income Americans. Medicaid and CHIP currently provide coverage for 45% of all children under the age of six and the Medicaid expansion helped more than 10 million adults gain coverage for the first time. The American Health Care Act threatens to cut off millions of young children and their parents from their health insurance and strip away the essential benefits guaranteed in Medicaid, which means that some women will no longer be assured they can get the medical services they need to have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby.

All children in America deserve a healthy start to life.  The American Health Care Act makes it harder and more expensive for families to access the health care they need to ensure that their children have the healthiest first 1,000 days and the opportunity to reach their full potential. 1,000 Days urges Congress to vigorously oppose this proposal and instead focus on building a healthcare system that ensures all mothers, babies and toddlers in America have the care they need to thrive.

New Research Sheds Light on Breaking Cycle of Malnutrition

Launched in cities around the world, The 2016 Global Nutrition Report underscores that malnutrition is a truly global problem affecting 1 in 3 people worldwide. The report examines how countries around the world are doing in reducing this number, and puts forward several recommendations to spur progress.

“We now live in a world where being malnourished is the new normal. It is a world that we must all claim as totally unacceptable,” said Lawrence Haddad, Co-Chair of the Global Nutrition Report’s Independent Expert Group and Senior Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Urgent action is needed is needed if the world is going to break this “new normal.” Here are two recommendations put forward by The 2016 Global Nutrition report:

  1. Drawing on research from the World Bank and Results for Development, the report estimates that countries will need to invest $7 billion in nutrition specific interventions in the next decade to meet the World Health Assembly (WHA) global nutrition targets on anemia, stunting, wasting and exclusive breastfeeding.
  2. The report also show the importance of collaborating across other sectors, like agriculture, water, sanitation and hygiene, and education in order to improve nutrition.

With this need for collaboration in mind, the United States government announced at the report launch in Washington, DC a plan to better coordinate between eleven U.S. agencies to align nutrition programming. This announcement fulfils a commitment made by the U.S. in 2013 as part of the first Nutrition for Growth summit.

In order to end malnutrition, the world can no longer accept it as the “new normal.” It is unacceptable that so many people suffer every day from the scourge of malnutrition. Pope Francis, in his remarks to the World Food Programme Board in Rome on Monday, June 13 said it best: “It is not enough to offer broad reflections or engage in endless discussion, constantly repeating things everyone knows. We need to “de-naturalize” extreme poverty, to stop seeing it as a statistic rather than a reality.” When the world normalizes extreme poverty, hunger and malnutrition, the faces and lives of the most effected are ignored.

As this new Global Nutrition Report highlights critical progress against malnutrition and the continued work that is needed, it is important not forget the stories of the people driving the progress – mothers working to nourish themselves and their children, small-holder farmers producing fruits and vegetables, and advocates speaking up for the importance of these programs in the U.S. and abroad.

Momentum for Global Nutrition Building in Wake Of Athlete Letter

In April, over 100 athletes sent a letter to President Obama urging global action on malnutrition. Since then, thousands of American citizens have signed on to a petition urging world leaders to make this August the start of the race to end malnutrition.

Read the full letter from the athletes below.

 

Dear President Obama:

This year, the Olympic moment is about more than sports. It’s an opportunity to shape the future.  On the eve of the 2016 Summer Olympics, world leaders will meet in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil at the Nutrition for Growth Summit and commit their governments’ support to ending malnutrition.

We ask that you make a gold medal pledge on behalf of the United States that will give kids around the world a winning start.  Good nutrition right from the beginning enables children to grow up healthy and strong, providing them the opportunity to reach their full potential.

As you know, malnutrition is responsible for nearly half of all childhood deaths around the world – more deaths than HIV/AIDS, malaria, and TB combined.  For a quarter of the world’s children, malnutrition early in life leaves them physically and developmentally stunted—an irreversible condition that limits a child’s ability to grow, learn, and thrive.  And yet only a tiny fraction of the funding for global health programs goes to the proven, life-saving nutrition programs that children need to grow up healthy.

It’s time to prioritize the nutrition of the world’s young children to ensure brighter and healthier futures.  It’s time for the United States to use the opportunity of the Nutrition for Growth Summit to make a bold commitment to give kids the strongest start to life.

We hope you will join us in racing toward a world free from malnutrition.

Sincerely,

Nia Ali

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Sirena Alise

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Anita Alvarez

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Phoebe Alvarez

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Jordin Andrade

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Yael Averbuch

FC Kansas City

Women’s Soccer

 

Jade Barber

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Melissa Barber

World Champion

USA Track & Field

 

Brigetta Barrett

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

 

Claire Barton

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Alison Bartosik

Olympian

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Amanda Bingson

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Eric Bird

Men’s Soccer

 

Muggsy Bogues

National Basketball Association

 

Shannon Boxx

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Nicole Branagh

Olympian

Beach Volleyball

 

Landria Buckley

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Rachel Buehler (Van Hollebeke)

Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Quentin Butler

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Landrai Buckley

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Amber Campbell

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Kristin Castlin

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Kori Carter

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Japheth Cato

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Kendra Chambers

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Jaime Crane-Mauzy

USA Skiing

 

Jeanee Crane-Mauzy

USA Skiing

 

Virginia Crawford

US Champion

USA Track & Field

 

Nicole Davis

Two-time Olympian

USA Volleyball

 

Sharon Day-Monroe

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Korey Dropkin

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Curling

 

Adam Durham

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Eric Fonoimoana

Olympian

USA Beach Volleyball

Julie Foudy

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Hyleas Fountain

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Bridget Franek

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Carin Gabarra

Olympian

Women’s Soccer

 

Morgan Goodwin

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Jeff Gordon

NASCAR

 

Erin Gray

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Jeff Green

National Basketball Association

 

Amanda Hahn

USA Triathlon

 

Mia Hamm

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Monica Hargrove

World Champion

USA Track & Field

 

Natasha Hastings

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Britney Henry

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Armintie Herrington

Women’s Basketball

 

Mackenzie Hil

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Mark Hollis

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Jennifer Hoy

Women’s Soccer

 

Nick Hundley

Major League Baseball

 

Tori Huster

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Marvellous Iheukwumere

2016 Olympic Hopeful

Nigeria Track & Field

 

Samantha Johnson

Chicago Red Stars

Women’s Soccer

 

Vanessa Jones

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Stanley Kebenei

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Four-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Phoebe Koroleva

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Ali Krieger

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Bernard Lagat

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Stephanie Lebby

USA Skiing

 

Muna Lee

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Mechelle Lewis (Freeman)

Olympian

USA & Jamaica Track & Field

 

Kristine Lilly (Heavey)

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Carli Lloyd

Two-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Alexis Love

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Crystal Manning

US Champion

USA Track & Field

Michael Mannozzi

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Arielle Martin

USA BMX

 

Alyssa Mautz

Women’s Soccer

 

Heather Mitts

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Gary Morgan

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Alonzo Mourning

Olympian

National Basketball Association

 

Dikembe Mutombo

National Basketball Association

 

David Oliver

Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Heather O’Reilly

Three-time Olympian

USA Women’s Soccer

 

Greg Nixon

World Champion

USA Track & Field

 

Kara Patterson

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Tori Pena

2016 Olympic Hopeful

Ireland Pole Vaulter

 

Chanelle Price

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

 

Kiana Profit

USA Track & Field

 

Elli Reed

Seattle Reign FC

Women’s Soccer

 

Britney Reese

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Ruth Riley

Olympian

USA Women’s Basketball

 

Sanya Richards-Ross

Two-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Jason Richardson

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Sarah Rodriquez

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

 

Alex Sachs

Olympian

Brazil Women’s Soccer

 

N’aithan Scott

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Danielle Scott-Aruda

Five-time Olympian

USA Volleyball

 

Jamie Sinclair

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Curling

 

Julianne Sitch

Women’s Soccer

 

Awvee Storey

National Basketball Association

 

Jared Sullinger

National Basketball Association

 

Jere Summers

USA Track & Field

 

LaTavia Thomas

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field

 

Stephanie Trafton

Three-time Olympian

USA Track & Field

 

Gary Vanderwege

Two-time Paralympian

USA Fencing

 

Todd Wharton

Men’s Soccer

 

Alison Williams

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Synchronized Swimming

 

Melinda Winthrow

2016 Olympic Hopeful

USA Track & Field