FDA Takes Steps Against Misleading Infant Formula Marketing

Baby Drinking Formula

More than 1,250 Americans joined 1,000 Days in support of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) effort to protect families from misleading infant formula marketing.

For the first time ever, the FDA is considering to ask infant formula manufacturers to substantiate claims they make on product labels and marketing materials. They want to encourage makers of formula to provide strong, scientific evidence to back up the health claims they make about their products.

Unsubstantiated claims like “reduces colic” or “aids digestion” are confusing to families who are looking to make decisions about what to feed their babies.

Families who depend on infant formula need to know that the products they are feeding their babies are as effective as the companies claim. That is why the FDA’s recommendations are an important first step in protecting families from bogus health claims made by manufacturers of infant formula.

1,000 Days submitted a letter in support of the FDA’s recommendations and also invited its community of grassroots supporters to add their name to the following letter. And in less than two weeks, 1,259 Americans added their name.

 

November 8, 2016

Susan T. Mayne
Director, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
c/o Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305)
Food and Drug Administration
5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061
Rockville, MD 20852

Re: Draft Guidance for Industry on Substantiation for Structure/Function Claims in Infant Formula Labels and Labeling

Dear Dr. Mayne,

It is encouraging to see that for the first time ever, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is asking infant formula companies to substantiate the claims made on infant formula labels.

As moms, dads, and caregivers, we have a right to know that the infant formula we buy is safe and effective. We need to have confidence that the claims made on formula labels are accurate and supported by scientific evidence. Companies need to step up and provide credible scientific research to back up the claims they make on their formula, such as “reduces colic” or “aids digestion.”

Given that so many babies in the U.S. rely on infant formula for their nutrition, we believe the FDA also needs to provide stronger oversight of these products and require companies to provide scientific proof that their products deliver the benefits that they claim.

As consumers and parents, we need accurate, credible information about what we’re feeding our babies. Our government needs to do all that it can to protect families from bogus health claims made by manufacturers of formula.

We, the undersigned, applaud the FDA’s proposed Substantiation for Structure/Function Claims Made in Infant Formula Labels and Labeling: Guidance for Industry and encourage the FDA to do more in protecting parents and babies from misleading marketing.

After all, the health and well-being of our country’s babies are at stake.

Sincerely,

1,259 Americans